HOWTO Uninstall root?

Hi there,

This might be a very naive question, but I have to ask it…
I’ve been having problems with my root software. There are some basic functions or operations I cannot perform, and I’m almost sure it is because I did no install root in a proper way, so I want to do it again, from the very beginning.
So, could you tell me how I can uninstall root?
I think my problem was I installed it in my own $HOME (Ubuntu), and apparently I didn’t do a correct configurations procedure :cry: .
Thanks a lot for your help.

Cheers,

Mario AAO.

1 Like

It depends on how you actually “installed” ROOT. Did you download the source and compile it yourself? Or did you download a binary .deb package and install it with a package manager?

If you used any kind of package manager (dpkg, apt-get, synaptic, aptitude, Ubuntu’s “Add Software” interface), then you should be able to remove it using that tool. Indeed that’s the recommended way to do it, otherwise the package manager might not realize that the package was removed. By the way, a non-bleeding-edge version of ROOT should be available in the standard Ubuntu repositories, so you can use Ubuntu’s graphical software manager to re-install, this should have zero configuration problems.

If you compiled ROOT yourself, then you can probably just find all files and directories associated with ROOT and delete them. You need to be careful because even though the root user is not enabled in Ubuntu, there are probably still files with the word “root” in the name which are essential system files. If you do:

sudo updatedb locate root|less
you should be able to spot the major directories where your files were placed. If you are lucky they are all in /home/maaceroo/ROOT or something. Then you can simply do

to remove those files. There should be no problems, since linux programs aren’t “registered” with the operating system like in Windows. Simply deleting the files is safe (and effective), as long as a package manager wasn’t involved.

Good luck!

Hi,
I have a related problem. I want ti get rid of Root v5.18 and use Root v5.20. I have built v5.20 myself, and the variables for PATH and LD_LIBRARY_PATH were defined accordingly at .bashrc. Running root, Root v5.18 is the one that gets launched

I have no clue how Root v5.18 was installed. I am using ubuntu 9.10. Checking using dpkg --get-selections | grep root
I get fakeroot install libroot-minuit5.18 install libroot5.18 install

Is libroot5.18 the bad guy that needs to be uninstalled? Thanks in advance.

Frances

Hi jfcaron,

Thanks for you help.

So, as far as I remember, I did download and compile the source by myself, however, it was when I had Ubuntu 10.04, and some days ago I have done an upgrade to 11.04, avoiding formating my hard disk. I wonder if this could be a source of problems.

And here I have another “problem”. By using synaptic to look for ROOT, I don’t get anything related to the CERN-ROOT software. As I said above, right now I have Ubuntu 11.04. Is it necessary to add the repositories? If so, how should I do it? :confused:

[quote=“jfcaron”]If you compiled ROOT yourself, then you can probably just find all files and directories associated with ROOT and delete them. You need to be careful because even though the root user is not enabled in Ubuntu, there are probably still files with the word “root” in the name which are essential system files. If you do:

sudo updatedb locate root|less
you should be able to spot the major directories where your files were placed. If you are lucky they are all in /home/maaceroo/ROOT or something. Then you can simply do

to remove those files. There should be no problems, since linux programs aren’t “registered” with the operating system like in Windows. Simply deleting the files is safe (and effective), as long as a package manager wasn’t involved.[/quote]
Finally, I have followed this procedure and I have found lots of files where root is located. What I mean is that it appears there are some ROOT-system files located in different directories. For instance, there is actually an executable file (/usr/local/bin/root -it actually tries to open ROOT, but some information is missing), and some others. I really don’t understand. I think I have done a configuration such that some files were placed around my system… :unamused:

Well, that’s the story. Thank you very much for your suggestions, and I hope you could give me some more help now. I really need to install ROOT properly. Right now it is very important for my job. And I want to do it correctly so I can make use of all its functions.

Cheers,
Mario AAO.

In Ubuntu 8.04,
I use “sudo apt-get install root-system” to install root.
use “sudo apt-get remove root-system” to uninstall.

Hi gjzeus,

In my case, root-system is not even installed. It has in it qt-4 which I do not want to use because I prefer qt3. Other ways on how to get rid an older installation?

Frances

Every Ubuntu user I’ve talked to seems to recommend avoiding the “upgrade” option when changing releases. They all say you should reinstall the latest Ubuntu from scratch. This is why I exclusively use the “LTS” releases, so that full re-installs are only every 3 years.

From your description it sounds like root was indeed compiled locally, using the “Fixed installation location” option described at root.cern.ch/drupal/content/inst … oot-source .

This case is probably the most difficult to remove, because you have to track down all the files where root lives. For example there might be stuff in /usr/share, /usr/include, /usr/lib, /usr/local/lib, and probably other places as well. Fortunately I think even if you only find a fraction of the files (the binary you mentioned is probably the most important) to delete, the “orphaned” files aren’t a big problem unless you are critically low on disk space.

So go ahead and make a list of the main directories where you find likely root files, then double-check to make sure they are actually CERN ROOT files and not “default administrator” root files, then try to sudo rm -r them. You will probably also want to check your .bashrc or .bash_profile files in your home directory, in case you had added specific settings for LD_LIBRARY_PATH.

Looking a bit online, it looks like Ubuntu 11.04 doesn’t have root in the repositories, though 10.04 did. Looks like you’ll have to (re)compile it manually. I suggest using the “location-independent” installation method, since it makes removal much easier later (just 1 directory to remove). Several people seem to recommend this page for advice, though I haven’t tried it myself: thecampaign.eu/?p=73

Again, good luck, but this is probably as much help as I can provide on the subject!

Go to the directory it’s installed in ($ROOTSYS) and use

I’m working on trying to rebuild 5.22-00j with gcc 4.6.3 on Ubuntu 12.04 and that seemed to do the trick for me.

Take care,
Ellie